Hesperian Health Guides

Brittle Bone Disease

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HealthWiki > Disabled Village Children > Chapter 13: Children Who Stay Small or Have Weak Bones > Brittle Bone Disease


The child is born with bent or twisted limbs, or with broken bones. (Or he may seem normal at birth, and the bones begin to break later.) He may start to walk at near the normal age, but increasing deformities due to breaks may soon make walking impossible. Because of the many broken and bent bones, these children stay very short. Parents sometimes do not realize when their child breaks a bone.

Brittle bone disease is not common. Sometimes it is inherited, and someone else in the family will have the same problem.

There is no medical treatment. However, sometimes surgery can be done to straighten and strengthen the leg bones by putting a metal rod down the middle of them. This may help the child walk for longer, but he may eventually need a wheelchair to move about. Back problems increase with age; a body brace may help.

SIGNS OF BRITTLE BONE DISEASE
a child with brittle bone disease
broad forehead
deafness may develop
white part of eye looks blue
poor teeth
barrel chest and rounded back
bones bent and shortened from many fractures (broken bones)

Children with brittle bone disease are often intelligent and do well in school. Increasing deafness may become a problem. Help them to develop their minds and learn skills that do not require physical strength. The child must learn how to protect his body from breaks. It helps to sleep on a firm bed.

Children with brittle bone disease are often intelligent and do well in school. Increasing deafness may become a problem. Help them to develop their minds and learn skills that do not require physical strength. The child must learn how to protect his body from breaks. It helps to sleep on a firm bed.



This page was updated:19 Jan 2018